Video Games Aren’t All Bad

Video GamesLot’s of parents believe that playing video games is a bad practice for children, especially violent video games.  We have been told it makes kids aggressive and violent but society today has less violent crime per capita than it did in the 80’s and 90’s when violent video games started.

We heard boys describe failure in school as taboo, and failure in a game as desirable. We heard boys describe facile ways of dividing up leadership and recognizing one another’s expertise in the most collaborative and generative of ways — which also happens to be the key to a diverse workplace.

Turns out that video games teach kids how to overcome frustration.  They learn patience trying to figure out games, as well as persistence.  Many online games like Call of Duty also teaches leadership and teamwork as well as strategy.

We reject games because they’re violent, individualistic, competitive, engrossing and largely foreign to us as teachers, parents, leaders, adults. And these are the precise characteristics of boys that we reject when we enforce zero tolerance policies.

Video games certainly can have their downfalls but letting little Jimmy play Medal of Honor isn’t likely to turn him into a mass murderer or a psychopath.  Children, especially boys, are violent in nature.  Early childhood before video games should have gotten them on the path to controlling their anger and rage and putting it into a constructive form.

Why video games shouldn’t freak parents out

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